Friday, July 22, 2011

I finally had some caviar and liked it!

 Caviar Photo from New England Fine Living

My first introduction to caviar was years ago when it was passed to me on a perfect little wafer crisp.  It wasn't very intimidating, so I tried it.   Not so bad.... Hmmm.   My next official introduction to this odd little treat, was at a wine tasting event many years ago.   Now, I was intimidated.  In front of me were little jars of red, black, gold caviar that were available for mini tastings.  Along side the jars were bowls of cracker crisps.  Huh???  There is no one to serve me?  What if I take too much and get my hand slapped?  The only person available is talking to someone else and the line was backing up behind me.  Panic!  How do I put it on the cracker and how much can I take?   Do the different colors taste different? What kind of fish produced these?  I wanted to know. Oh but please don't tell me how the eggs are taken from the fish while I eat it.

This situation, is one of the many reasons I started New England Fine Living.  To share my  information with you.

Here are a few tips on eating caviar. Geeeeeesh,  I wish I knew this before the wine tasting event.  If you want to find out more about where caviar comes from and some of the nutritional facts, you can read more HERE on my caviar page, but some of the tips are here below that I found.


Caviar Etiquette: 
   Serve cold out of a non-metallic bowl.
   So as not to ruin the flavor of caviar, scoop it out of the container using mother-of-pearl utensils.  If necessary use a wood or plastic spoon.  NEVER  use a metallic spoon metal oxidizes the eggs), which will create an unwanted metal flavor.
Don’t dig deep and mush the caviar while you’re serving yourself or others.  Caviar should be scooped from the container vertically from top to bottom to avoid crushing the egg.
   If caviar is passed to you in a bowl or crock, with its own spoon, serve a teaspoonful onto your plate.  Many times it is passed with just toast points, but if it is followed with accompaniments, use the individual serving spoon found in each containter to take small amount of minced onion and sieved egg whites and yolks, as well as a few lemon slices and place on your dish.
    Assemble a canapĂ© to your taste with a knife, then use your fingers to lift it to your mouth.
   If you're at a cocktail party or reception, where prepared caviar canapĂ©s are being passed on trays, simply lift one off the plate and pop it into your mouth.
   When served caviar as an hors d'oeuvre, no matter how much you might be tempted by its luscious flavor. It's considered bad taste to eat more than an ample serving of about two ounces, or about two spoonfuls.